Bk 1.xxx. 1-2 de Glossis

 

USEFUL LINKS

The subject of  medieval glosses and glossaries is now well developed and the literature both substantial and rather technical.   Copeland offers good scholarly overview:

Kirsten Herdman’s blogpost starts from the very basics, ideal for the intelligent layman and engaged beginner:

 Herdman’s address suggests the blog should be titled:  ‘The University of Notre Dame, Australia‘.  [THE]  University of Notre Dame is, of course, in Paris.  

See also:

  • Sinéad O’Sullivan, ‘The Sacred and the Obscure: Greek and the Carolingian Reception of Martianus Capella’, The Journal of Medieval Latin, Vol. 22 (2012). You can read the Journal’s Index online, and the article is available without charge through academia.edu [HERE].
  • _____________, Obscurity, Pagan Lore, and Secrecy in Glosses on Books I-II from the Oldest Gloss Tradition’, IN Sinéad O’Sullivan and Mariken Teeuwen (eds.), Carolingian scholarship and Martianus Capella: Ninth-century commentary traditions on Martianus’ ‘De nuptiis’ in context. Brepols, Turnhout, 2011. (Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages ; Vol. 12).p. 99-122.
  •                               – reviewed by Padraic Moran in Early Medieval Europe 22 (2014), 381–4. – also through academia.edu.
  • _____________, ‘Early Medieval Glosses’, Osullivanglosses, blogspot (April 21st., 2012).

 

The next paper was published in the highly-regarded series,  Textes et Etudes du Moyen Age  (no. 54: ‘Rethinking and Recontextualising Glosses: new perspectives in the study of late Anglo-Saxon Glossography’.)

John Marenbon, in a paper whose title closely echoes (or is closely echoed by) that given the volume, notes that only certain texts received very detailed glosses, and specifies which they were –  in connection with Platonic studies.

  • John Marenbon, ‘Plato in the Middle Ages, a doxographic approach’ in Stephen Gersh, M. J. F. M. Hoenenor (eds.), The Platonic Tradition in the Middle Ages: A Doxographic Approach (2002). See esp. pp. 80ff

Reymolds offers one example of the theoretical debate:

Though this removal of discourse to the style of intellectual history can too often result in what is an intellectualised story sliding into subjectivity and self-confident imagination, studies of medieval glossing remain at present firmly grounded.

Janine Larmon Petersen’s  article (see below) seems a little ambitious in its effort to discuss a single manuscript – a school-book copy of  Lucan’s  Pharsalia – in terms suggesting a radical revision of the entire field has occurred or will be provoked by her paper. An interesting read, nonetheless.  A taste of the author’s style:

“Stratified glosses exist in the schoolbook that has several centuries of commentary inscribed in its margins by various hands. This type of glossing primarily occurs for a text that was part of the canon of medieval and humanist education. The manuscript I will discuss in this paper, New Haven, Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library MS. 332, a late twelfth-century codex of the Roman poet Lucan’s De bello civili (commonly known as the Pharsalia), addresses the issues between gloss and gloss, shedding light in particular on how medieval schools defined and utilized textbooks. The examination of the glosses in this codex reveals that the student glossators of this work engaged in a dialectical relationship about how to approach this medieval textbook. The medieval understanding of the text differed depending on the chronological period of its readers.”  (from the Project Muse summary)

The Ornaments

Composite: border edited from Brit.Lib. MS Add 42130 (f. 141v);  image of glosses from Brit.Lib. MS Add 17392 (f.1r).

band: detail from Brit.Lib. MS Add 42130 f. 14v

border 2 –  detail from Brit.Lib. MS Add 42130 f.38r

motif: detail from Brit.Lib MS Add. 42130  f.113r.. rotated 90 degrees.

 

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